Tag Archives: mental illness

Release Blitz: Power Inversion by Sara Codair

Power Inversion | Sara Codair

Evanstar Chronicles #2

BANNER2 - Power Inversion

Publisher: NineStar Press

Release Date: Monday, June 22nd, 2020

Length: 84,000

Cover Artist: Natasha Snow

Buy Links:

Publisher: https://ninestarpress.com/product/power-inversion/

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08BF1KP2C

B&N: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/power-inversion-sara-codair/1137213317?ean=2940164399986

Goodreads Link: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/50517249-power-inversion

COVER - Power Inversion

Blurb

Do you have to be a monster to fight one?

Erin Evanstar is a demon hunter, a protector of humanity from nightmarish predators that feed on people’s fears and flesh. They are settling into their dual life of being a teen and hunting demons.

When a tentacled horror abducts Erin’s partner, José, Erin and their family go on the hunt to get him back. But Erin gets an ultimatum: help the Fallen Angels bring on the apocalypse or watch José die. Erin will do anything to save José, but fighting monsters comes with a grim price–becoming one themselves.

Trigger Warnings: Violence, Death, Death of a Minor Character, Temporary Death of a Main Character, Mention of Past Abuse, Mention of Miscarriage, Pregnancy of Side Character, Self-harm, Suicidal Ideation, Guns, Grief, Kidnapping/abduction, alcohol use, brief depiction of humans enslaved by a supernatural creature

Excerpt

White graduation caps fell from the sky like flakes of vaporized Demon. High school was a beast, and I’d vanquished it like every monster I’d fought, with one exception—myself.

This moment deserved savoring.

Breathing deliberately, I slowed my perception of time until the caps seemed as if they were falling through cold honey on their way to the ground.

The late-spring sun beat down on me, but a breeze kept the temperature bearable. Some tassels lilted southeast—away from the towering clouds bruising the northwest sky. The weather wasn’t going to hold much longer, but I was okay with that. Thunderstorms awoke something wild in me—a pulse-racing, dance-around-like-no-one-can-see-you kind of wild—a rush of adrenaline almost as good as what I’d get from battling a Troll or sparring with Mel.

With my sense of time slowed down, the distant thunder sounded like a lion purring. The clouds glowed purple as lightning forked through them like an X-ray, temporarily revealing a mass of tentacles undulating in the clouds.

Mel, did you see that? I thought as loudly as I could, hoping my telepathic cousin would hear me.

I’d seen a lot of different Demons in the three months I’d been hunting them, but based on the stories and the Lexicon, the massive tentacled ones only materialized in oceans, and they certainly could not fly. Yet, every time lightning flashed, there they were, waving as if violent updrafts were a gentle breeze.

My heart sped up. My hands closed into fists. Mel didn’t reply.

I shut my eyes, opening my mind so I could feel all the energy around me. Most humans were blobs of buzzing heat, but Mel, a hybrid of human, Angel, and Elf, had a hotter, more intense aura with a spritz of simultaneously depressed and optimistically peppy texture. I found her near my Elven grandmother, who felt like a condensed thunderstorm.

Mel? Niben? Can you hear me? Did you see that?

Of course, there was a good chance they were both shielding. What telepath would have their mind open to other people’s thoughts when there were so many other people around?

One who hasn’t been able to properly shield in months. Mel’s melodic yet squeaky voice was a welcome presence in my mind. Shut down the hyper drive. You’re giving me a headache.

I exhaled over the course of ten seconds, willing my sense of time back to normal.

A garbled din of stretched-out voices morphed to something more akin to a clattering avalanche of pots and pans. A shoulder jostled mine. The corner of a graduation cap crashed into my head.

Erin? What had you wanted to tell me?

There were tentacles in the clouds, I thought at Mel, turning in the general direction I sensed her in.

I crashed into José, who, of course, stood right next to me.

“You okay?” he asked. Tears glistened in his midnight eyes and trickled down his sun-kissed cheeks. One snagged on the crooked tip of his nose. He clutched two graduation caps, his and mine, so tight that the scars on his knuckles were visibly stretched.

“Yeah. Are you?” I wondered if I should tell him what I’d seen. He’d been hunting Demons longer than me, but he also thrived on keeping school and the supernatural as two separate entities. And what if they hadn’t been tentacles? What if the storm had just appeared that way with the lightning in slow motion? I didn’t want to ruin his day if there wasn’t an actual threat.

“I’ll miss everyone.” He stuffed the caps under his arms and hugged me. While I wanted to celebrate because I’d made it out alive, he mourned the loss of a place that had been a haven to him for four years.

I leaned my head on his shoulder, listening to his heartbeat, trying to let his steady warmth calm the worry growing in my mind. José’s body was a rock in the sense that it was hard and athletic, but also because it anchored me when I felt as if my mind was running away.

Have you ever watched a storm with time slowed that much? asked Mel.

I shook my head before I remembered there were dozens of people between her and me. No. Do storm clouds in slow motion look like tentacles?

José kissed my hair and whispered, “Are you talking to Mel?”

I nodded.

“Is she okay?”

“She’s having trouble shielding. We should go meet up with her and the others anyway.” I stepped away from him and walked uphill.

Students, who wore white graduation robes, and their parents, who were dressed mostly in summer dresses, slacks, and collared shirts, were clumped all over Saint Patrick’s sprawling lawn.

José draped his arm over my shoulder as I wove around groups of people. The pressure was calming, lulling panic monsters back to sleep with its warm weight. I glanced up at the clouds. They were closer and darker. The wind sped up, stealing programs from a dozen people’s hands. The clouds lit up with lightning, but I didn’t see any tentacles.

Mel’s voice popped back into my head. I don’t sense anything in the clouds, and neither does Niben. I guess she’s been restraining the storm for half the ceremony. Perhaps you were seeing her power mingled with it?

Maybe. Some tension unraveled from my chest. I’d heard stories about my grandmother, Niben, controlling storms, but I’d never seen her do it. In fact, I’d never witnessed her do any magic unless she was modeling something she wanted me to try. She’d come on a few hunts, but she’d just watched with her unblinking feline eyes and later quizzed me on what I did right and wrong. For all I knew, her fabled storm magic could resemble tentacles.

BANNER1 - Power Inversion

About The Author

no glasses rock headshot arms crossed

Sara Codair is an author of short stories and novels, which are packed with action, adventure, magic, and the bizarre. They partially owe their success to their faithful feline writing partner, Goose the Meowditor-In-Chief, who likes to “edit” their work by deleting entire pages.

If Sara isn’t writing, they’re probably teaching, swimming in the lake, reading fantasy, or walking their dog.

Social Media

Author Website: https://saracodair.com/

Author Facebook (Author Page): https://www.facebook.com/SaraCodair1

Author Twitter: https://twitter.com/ShatteredSmooth

Author Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shatteredsmooth/

Author Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15858102.Sara_Codair

Author Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Sara-Codair/e/B072L4C869/ref=dp_byline_cont_ebooks_1

 Giveaway

Sara is giving away a $10 Amazon gift card with this blog tour.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

MEME2 - Power Inversion

A thorough examination of the black dog of depression

Rewritten (Unscripted, #2)Rewritten by J.R. Gray

My rating: 3.5 of 5 stars

This book is very well done, it’s an excellent examination into the black dog of mental illness and chronic depression and how it can take someone into places they don’t want to go and there isn’t a single thing they can do about it.

It’s also intense and filled with devotion and promises of love, it’s steamy and hot, with chemistry-laded sex and emotional conversations.

I am probably an outlier with my view here, as most other reviewers have loved it, and I would absolutely recommend it to lovers of angst, because nothing felt gratuitous where Quell’s mental illness was concerned.

On the contrary, Quell’s descent into his depression was all the more heart-breaking to read because you can see him knowing it’s happening but being unable to stop it.

But, for me, I didn’t want to read about Quell and Hale struggling after they’d been left in a pretty happy place at the end of Unscripted. I hadn’t realised, when I said I’d review this one, that it was going to be revisiting their relationship.

While everything is executed with skill, I couldn’t enjoy this book as much as perhaps if I’d been reading about a pairing dealing with the effects of mental illness who I hadn’t already seen struggle through to get what I thought was a strong Happy For Now with hope of a long term future.

***SPOILER***

I did feel frustrated with their best mates Mel and Ella though, who were on the outside and knew a lot of what was going on but didn’t intervene to make sure both Quell and Hale knew the other person was miserable, which I feel could have had a more satisfactory resolution much earlier. 

***END***

#ARC kindly received from the author in return for an honest and unbiased review

View all my reviews

Another masterful demonstration of how to write a complex character romance

FallingFMR coverFalling For My Roommate by Garrett Leigh

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

When it comes to reviewing a Garrett Leigh book, I always have to think about just what I want to say and how to say it.

That’s because I really believe the best way to experience her stories is to pick them up and read them without much prior knowledge.

She is a master storyteller. She delves deeply into the psyche of humanity, and not just the typical ‘perfect’ alpha specimens but the ones who are the most complicated and in need of understanding.

In Micha, I think she’s possibly hit the ultimate goal for demonstrating how mental health care is so vitally important.

This book also delves deeply into the shitty and reprehensible behaviour of elements of the British media and the staggering fact that – some 30 years after Justin Fashanu became the first top level professional footballer to come out, with ultimately tragic results – there haven’t been any more since.

The pressure cooker of top flight football is difficult to comprehend from the outside, but the fallout of a life being exposed to the tabloids scrutiny is so brilliantly illustrated in this book.

My heart broke for Micah, for the mental turmoil he lived with. Garrett’s books never sugarcoat the seriousness and there’s never any cure by ‘magic dick’.

And Sam, he’s not a white knight saviour who stops all the problems from affecting their life. But I absolutely loved every bit of this down-to-earth Yorkshire lad.

I’ve mentioned in previous reviews how much I love the interconnected nature of the books Garrett writes.

While this one stands alone, it is in the same world as her Lucky series and I appreciated the mention of characters from those books.

So, pick it up and fall into another wonderfully evocative and effortless championing of the need to pay serious attention to mental health issues.

You’ll also fall in love with two different men who are able to work with what life gives them and find their own happiness together.

#ARC kindly received from the author in return for an honest and unbiased review.

View all my reviews

« Older Entries