Utterly brilliant dark ride through an unconventional romance

We Met in DeathWe Met in Death by K.A. Merikan

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

There is no one who writes this type of tortured and twisted romance quite like Kat and Agnes Merikan and this book is an utterly brilliant dark ride.

From the opening scene of a cemetery at night to a farmhouse shootout, this book delivers on the spooky, creepy and thrilling plot points with a side order of violence wholly in keeping with the narrative.

The Merikan guys are not heroes in the conventional sense, but they have their own code of honour which teeters on the brink of being one step above unforgivable until they meet their true loves. Then all bets are off.

Robert and Nathan are an explosive combination, screwed up, brooding, on the run and with so much baggage they should have an airport trolley to carry it.

But when Robert finally gets his head out of his backside and deals with his fears, he turns into a truly considerate and loving partner, while still worrying about his ex mobster boss and his mum finding out he’s gay.

With a deft hand, the authors bring it all together for an explosive tension packed last 25% which you can’t put down. Don’t be put off by the cover, it perfectly sums up the film noir feel to the narrative.

#ARC kindly provided by the authors in return for an honest and unbiased review

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Great intro collection for the works of TC Orton

Year One Collection: 2016Year One Collection: 2016 by T.C. Orton

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

3.5*

Great introduction to the work of TC Orton for those who might not have come across him before.

There’s a mix of excellent paranormal which focuses on various themes including the usual tropes of vampires, shifters, magic and the supernatural.

ETA 12/9/17: Half my review seems to have gone missing so here’s the rest!

Seeing Red: Scorched is the vampire one, featuring a shy, naive Isaac and a whole stack of sexy vampire men. It’s a little bit cheesy but it works perfectly for the setting. Once the guys head out to the coast, things really picked up. However, the 70% plot shift may piss off a lot of readers even if it is cleverly played out.

Omega Moon: Ahh, the shifters, the student/teacher one, the mPreg one. This isn’t quite as polished as the others but it’s still a compelling idea which perhaps just needed tightening up a bit. There’s a correlation between Alec being gay and discovering he’s also a werewolf which doesn’t quite work as well as it should. The mystery element of the story is plotted well though.

Warlock Academy: This is the “Harry Potter” which is perhaps an unfair comparison because it’s not really, other than it’s set in a school for people to learn magic. It switches PoV between the two main characters and each has a unique voice. There’s hot hot hot sex, a villainous bully, great bunch of secondary cast and intriguing world development.

The above three are all set in the same universe with elements of cross over. The final story in the collection is a contemporary College Climax. I believe this one was TC’s debut and you can tell. I didn’t find this one particularly compelling, Lucas is an arse, Sebastian is fairly pathetic, there’s sexual shenanigans which come out of the blue and it has a cliffhanger ending.

Still, taken as a collection, it’s a good way of sounding out the author.

#ARC received from the author in return for an honest and unbiased review.

The delay in reviewing occurred because BT are idiots and locked me out of my email address for almost a month so I couldn’t get into files or my blog site (I needed to reset the password).

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Enjoyable contemporary with an Austen twist

True Love at the Lonely Hearts Bookshop (Lonely Hearts Bookshop #2)True Love at the Lonely Hearts Bookshop by Annie Darling

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I really enjoyed this one, which was a surprise because it’s rare these days that I read any hetero relationships or chick lit but this certainly didn’t have any annoying alpha males or simpering females.

I thought both Verity and Johnny were well crafted characters, believable and real, human and alternatively frustrating and fascinating. Very’s obsession with Pride & Prejudice was neatly woven into the whole story narrative and never felt like a deliberate plot device and it worked well as the hook to hang their unconventional relationship on.

The introduction chapter was one of the funniest and most engaging I’ve read in a contemporary chick lit romance for a long time and actually had me chuckling out loud. Very’s mad family and bunch of friends meshed well and provided a nice contrast with Johnny’s, who were a bit posher and – at times – much more standoff ish.

Marissa, the technical villain of the piece, never became a caricature, I’ve met a fair few Marissa’s in my long years and she played true to type, a narcissistic selfish woman who couldn’t bear to let go of her devoted suitor.

The resolution was lovely but the epilogue was a bit of a waste, far too short even if it was quite sweet.

#ARC received from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest and unbiased review

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