Tag Archives: complicated families

Kade crafts a beautiful romance that’s grounded in realness

60488772._SY475_HOME by Kade Boehme

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Getting a new book from Kade Boehme is such a joy, he’s a beautiful narrator of romance and in HOME he’s crafted a truly gorgeous story about two men who feel real.

The narrative itself isn’t complicated, two men meet by chance, they have connection, they stay in touch and meet up again before a third surprise encounter leads them to discover they’ve got more in common than they thought.

It’s a story which takes the reader into the journey they make in coming to terms not only with their own individual situations but with the additional baggage that comes with having a social group that’s been brought together through marriage.

Throughout the realness of their relationship makes you feel like you’re reading about two people you know, there’s a solid grounding which adds depth and makes the story stay with you.

Jase is older than Cody, but because of his lateness in coming out, his time in the Forces, he’s not much more advanced in the ways of being a gay man, he’s not really had relationships, he’s avoided rocking the boat with his mother.

Cody is a sweetheart who’s gone through some rough stuff, he’s forever trying to live up to unrealistic expectations and he feels a mound of guilt over how he let things get on top of him when he was away at college.

I felt Kade dealt both sensitively and honestly with Cody’s ADHD, something that had gone undiagnosed throughout his childhood and which his father still refuses to accept. All the tensions between Cody and his family felt believable and there are no easy solutions offered up here.

The dynamic between Jase and Cody is also well represented, they switch between being the strong one and needing support equally, there’s no magic dick here and I did have to chuckle when Kade uses Cody’s honest dialogue to express to Jase his frustrations that he won’t ever be cured even though he has the stability of their relationship.

There’s some wonderful secondary characters present throughout and a very strong sense of place. The community the men live in is brought to life through snippets and visits to events which draw all the disparate threads together.

It’s so wonderful to see Kade writing again and I really hope this is the first of many to come!

#ARC kindly received from the author in return for an honest and unbiased review

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Release Blitz: The Ghosts Between Us by Brigham Vaughn

The Ghosts Between Us | Brigham Vaughn

The West Hills: Chris & Elliot

RBBANNER-51

Buy Links: 

Universal Link: https://books2read.com/b/TheGhostsBetweenUs

Exclusive to Amazon and Available to Borrow with Kindle Unlimited

Length: 130,000 words approx.

Copy of Ghosts Between Us Cover (1).jpg

Blurb

Dr Christopher Allen knows how to deal with death. He’s a psychiatrist who works with hospice patients and their families, helping them cope with grief and letting go. But Chris’s job doesn’t prepare him for the sudden death of his devil-may-care brother Cal.

At Cal’s funeral, Chris is completely thrown when he meets Elliot Rawlings, an artist Cal has been dating. Chris is hurt to discover that the brother he knew as straight was actually bisexual. Elliot is angry and resentful of having been kept hidden from Cal’s family.

After the funeral, a night of drinking at the bar with Cal’s friends leads to Chris and Elliot falling into bed together. The next morning, they’re overwhelmed by guilt and grief and agree to never speak of it again.

But Cal’s apartment needs to be packed up and Elliot reluctantly agrees to help Chris, as well as answer some questions about Cal’s life and their relationship. Despite their guilt and initial dislike for one another, they sort through the pieces of Cal’s life and begin to fall for each other.

Despite his best efforts to fix things, Chris’s family seems to be crumbling around him and he begins to question who he is and what his role with them is. As his feelings for Elliot grow, Chris must decide if they’re worth further damaging his fragile relationships with his friends and family.

Elliot’s rough upbringing has left him distrustful of getting close to anyone, much less another man who isn’t willing to acknowledge him in public. The odds seem stacked against Chris and Elliot, but if they can overcome them, they may be able to lay Cal’s ghost to rest, along with their own demons.

About The Author

Brigham Vaughn is on the adventure of a lifetime as a full-time author. She devours books at an alarming rate and hasn’t let her short arms and long torso stop her from doing yoga. She makes a killer key lime pie, hates green peppers, and loves wine tasting tours.

A collector of vintage Nancy Drew books and green glassware, she enjoys poking around in antique shops and refinishing thrift store furniture. An avid photographer, she dreams of traveling the world and she can’t wait to discover everything else life has to offer her.

Her books range from short stories to novellas. They explore gay, bisexual, lesbian, and polyamorous romance in contemporary settings.

To stay up to date on her latest releases, sign up for the Coles & Vaughn Newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dkyS7P

Social Media Links:

Facebook Author Page

Facebook Fan Group (Brigham’s Book Nerds)

Twitter


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Give me all the ice hockey men! Love these stories

Changing Lines (Harrisburg Railers, #1)Changing Lines by R.J. Scott

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The sign of a good book for me is when the ending comes upon you without you realising you’ve got through the whole narrative without wondering how long it is.

This book did just that for me. I’m a fan of RJ Scott anyway, this was the first I’ve read of VL Locey (although I have her Point Shot series on my Kindle waiting to be read) and together they put down a very good ice hockey romance.

I loved the fact there actually was ice hockey in this book! Games happened on the ice, training happened, it wasn’t all off the ice with the relationship being the only story. I liked the complexities of the two main characters’ families.

The age gap element was well done, never felt like a big deal and – while everything goes swimmingly with very little angst and is perhaps a touch unrealistic – you know what, I didn’t care. I don’t want to read about the horrors of a sportsman or woman coming out because that shit already happens in Real Life and it makes me incandescently angry.

That Mads and Ten could just be themselves with only a few hiccups made me happy. As this is book one in an interconnected series, it may be that some of that side of the story still has to come and I’m happy with that too.

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